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FLOOD WATERS | New Film Release

Last spring we had a small window to fish a dry section of river that can only be fished during high water. With runoff in full force and cloudy conditions in the the forecast, we set out searching the flood waters for streamer chasing trout. Here is our latest short film FLOOD WATERS.

 

Our signature series of Elk Ridge Snapback hats from the film can be purchased here: http://www.montana-wild.com/store

-Travis

Trekking Poles for Hunting

In the past I had seen only hunters in the high country using trekking poles for sheep hunts. I never really thought they would benefit my everyday hunting endurance and performance. This last summer I finally tested a pair of trekking poles, primarily using them for summer scouting hikes and during parts of the hunting season. I was greatly surprised how beneficial they were, while still being lightweight and not cumbersome. Below are 4 reasons why you should think about adding a trekking pole to your hunting gear arsenal.

1) Trekking poles help you balance. When hiking steep inclines, declines, and sidehills, trekking poles give you a third contact point with the ground. This allows you to have better balance and stability. I found that trekking poles in wet or snowy conditions was a life saver.

2) Gain better rhythm & hiking pace with trekking poles. On my first scouting trip using a trekking pole I noticed not only that I was able to hike faster, but also able to gain a rhythm in my hiking pace. Over long periods of hiking I noticed less fatigue, not to mention being able use arm strength to aid in pushing uphills and slowing impact on downhills. This was critical for long hikes, steep ascents, and also when packing out heavy loads.

 

3) Feel safer on technical hikes. When scouting this past summer, I had a steep ascent to a ridgetop that was covered in downfall. This stuff is nasty and I had no choice but to leap frog through the fallen trees. Having a trekking pole to help aid my balance, allowed myself to not fall and get speared by short branches on fallen trees. Overall I felt more comfortable in sketchy hiking situations when using a trekking poles.

4) Trekking poles have multiple uses. Not only are trekking poles a great hiking aid, but they can also double as a rest for your binos while glassing. I can’t stress having a steady rest when glassing enough. If your binos are shaking, your not picking up those small details on the hillsides.  Also, if you need a shelter you can use the trekking pole as a support for your tent or rain fly. This allows you to leave tent poles behind and possibly cut weight out of your overall backpack weight. The uses are endless, but creativity is a must. There is an Easton Connex accessory that makes your trekking poles into a pair of shooting sticks, which comes in very handy.

I highly recommend the Easton Carbon 3 Trekking Pole. Its easy to make height adjustments, lightweight, comfortable to use, and stays locked when heavy weight is added onto pole. The Carbon 3 poles come with powder baskets and tips for hardpack or snowpack conditions.

 

-Travis

 

Monday Meetings

The winter here in Western Montana has been mild to say the least so far.  Temperatures through January and now February have been well above normal and conditions resemble spring.  This has been frustrating for hunting coyotes but a blessing to all the fisherman who have had enough of winter already.  After the F3T recently toured through Missoula I’m sure most anglers have been out on the water ripping lip.  It was so warm the river had bumped 1100 cfs in a day and we were riding out the flat before it dropped again.  The forecast was looking gloomy with a strong likelyhood of rain throughout the afternoon.  We weren’t super sure if today would be the best day to float. We quickly decided that given it was Monday, what other way would be a great way to kick off the week, so we hit the road and met up with our good friend Josh Rokosch.  The boat hit the water and a few bends in the river later and Travis had a solid rainbow.

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The next couple hours were full of hookups mainly by Travis.  I bet he had me beat 10 to 0 at one point!

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And yes vibes were solid all around.

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The fishing was surpassing our expectations for what one would think fishing in February would be.  There was a short period of time where I almost tied on a skwalla just to see what would happen.  I didn’t but the rest of the day was full of plenty of laughs and a few more trout.

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Stoked to get back out and see what this spring has to offer!

 

Bully Decals are now in stock! You can purchase them here> http://www.montana-wild.com/store/shop

-Zack

YETI Field Notes – 12 Steps to Making a Sick Fishing Film

With our film Bucknasty Browns coming out on this year’s Fly Fishing Film Tour we wanted to put together an informative write up on how to make a sick fishing film.  There are a lots of guys out there trying to break out onto the fishing scene and hopefully this will provide a little insight on how we create our films and help you on your next project.  We have 5 of the 12 steps included here.  For the full write up visit YETI’s Field Notes page @http://yeticoolers.com/pages/blog/12-tips-from-filmmaking-pros/

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#2. Pick Your Location – Amongst filmmakers and photographers alike this is a big one. Some locations are much more appealing than others. By putting yourself in a scenic setting that is conducive to a camera being pointed its direction, your chances of getting quality shots goes up dramatically. This is something to be thought of ahead of time and even better if you can go pre-scout the area. Take a day or two and go fish your location. Figure out where you can catch fish. What angles would capture that fishing spot the best? What time of day will light the water the best for that location? How difficult is it to get there with camera gear? The list goes on and it’s helpful to carry a notepad with you on these scouting trips. With location you also need to think about what time of year is the most ideal for your story and filming? Do you want to film in the winter when the colors are drab and bleak or would late spring when everything is green and vibrant work best for the feel of your film? If the location has a unique story this will also strengthen the piece if you are telling a narrative throughout the film. With that being said this brings up the question of whether you want to disclose the location or not. There is no right or wrong here, this is a personal decision based off your ethical beliefs. If the water is well known it’s common to use the name. If the story revolves around the fishery then it’s also common to use the name. If it’s a secret spot or something you don’t want others fishing then don’t say and be very careful of what you show in the film. In today’s world there are lots of ways to figure out where someone was especially when they have filmed there.

trout, fly fishing, montana, backcountry, wild, cutthroat

#8. Show the Eat – One of the coolest parts about fishing is seeing the fish come up and gobble your fly. Whether it’s a redfish eating a popper or a brown trout slamming a mouse, it’s always captivating watching the fish take the fly. Get great shots of the eat and instantly improve the appeal of your film.

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#12. Fish the Golden Hour – The golden hour is the time of epic golden light just after sunrise and just before sunset. The lighting is dramatic and just about anything filmed this time of day will look sick. If you can line up your best fishing action to take place during this time of day you’re ahead of the game.

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#3. Know Your Camera – This is a big one and deserves its fair share of time invested. Having shots that are well exposed, framed correctly, and in focus will make huge leaps and bounds in your film. This means you need to know how to control and optimize the settings on your camera. Spend some time online seeing what information and feedback is out there on your camera. Once you are comfortable with it go do some tests. Shoot in different lighting conditions, different weather, and with different angles and focal lengths. What looked good and why? What looked like crap and why? Be open to criticism and solicit it. You’ll be better off in the long run. Additionally have a tripod and know how to use it well. Shaky footage is hard to watch. If you don’t have a tripod learn ways to stabilize your camera.

To read the full article please visit > http://yeticoolers.com/pages/blog/12-tips-from-filmmaking-pros/

 

-Zack